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SHAME

100 REASONS FOR TURNING RED

26.11.2016 – 5.6.2017

 

An exhibition by Deutsches Hygiene-Museum, Dresden

 

The sense of shame is a feeling we have been familiar with ever since we were children, and even as adults we encounter it time and again in all sorts of situations. No-one really likes to feel ashamed; on the contrary: shame is rather an unpleasant feeling. So perhaps it’s worth taking a closer look at what this emotion is all about.

 

Most of the time shame can completely overwhelm us – and we don’t have to think long and hard about why we feel ashamed. And the reactions it triggers are nothing if not physical. We begin to sweat, we blush, or we hide our face. We reasons why and how much we feel ashamed can vary greatly from one person to the next.

 

But shame is far more than a merely subjective emotion. Psychologists and sociologists have described its elementary significance for the proper functioning of society. Indeed, shame imperceptibly connects an individual’s self-perception with the values and rules of his or her community. So the capacity to feel shame also contributes to the inner cohesion of a particular society. In any case there is one thing that visitors to the exhibition will soon realise: it is a complete misconception to think that we live in shameless times, as some cultural critics would have us believe!

 

Alongside cultural-historical exhibits, documents and media, the exhibition also showcases

works by the following artists: Nobuyoshi Araki (*1940), Kurdwin Ayub (*1990), Leigh

Bowery (1961–1994), Jörg Buttgereit (*1963), VALIE EXPORT (*1940), Christian Jankowski

(*1968), Terence Koh (*1977), Leigh Ledare (*1976), Victoria Lomasko (*1978), Alex McQuilkin

(*1980), Erik van Lieshout (*1968), Margret – Secret Diary (1969/70), Ferhat Özgür (*1965), Dennis

O’Rourke (1945–2013), Bruce Richards (*1948), Rokudenashiko (*1972), Joanna Rytel (*1974),

Sašo Sedlaček (*1974), Jan M. Sieber (*1975) und Ralph Kistler (*1969), Thomas Schütte (*1954),

Helmut Schwickerath (*1938), Miroslav Tichý (1926–2011), Phillip Toledano (*1968), Oliviero Toscani (*1942), Danh Vō (*1975), Marie Voignier (*1974)

 

 

 

THE 100 REASONS

On your way round the central body of the exhibition you’ll come across all 100 reasons for being ashamed – and even a few more:

 

 

1 Being looked at

2 Blushing

3 Being sized up

4 Cutting a poor figure

5 Not being normal

6 Flaws

7 Crooked nose

8 Being ill

9 Skin rash

10 BMI

11 Disrobing / Removing one’s clothes

12 Being scanned

13 Touching

14 Masturbating

15 Being in love

16 Private parts

17 Farting

18 Tensing

19 Being curious

20 Foreign customs

21 Unveiling

22 Lack of respect

23 Incomprehension

24 Camera view

25 Defecation

26 Being naked

27 Short skirts

28 Being on display

29 Erection

30 Uncertainty

31 Being inducted

32 Being the focal point

33 Losing face

34 Having no voice

35 Quarrelling

36 Slighted honour

37 Indiscretion

38 Sin

39 Feeling of guilt

40 Being defiled

41 The holy of holies

42 Philanthropy

43 Secrets

44 Family

45 Two-timing

46 Pride

47 Forgetting

48 Public opinion

49 Monitoring

50 Lack of recognition

51 Disproportionality

52 Wittiness

53 Crossing the line

54 Being German

55 Remembering

56 Hate

57 Bigotry

58 Homelessness

59 Poverty

60 Helping

61 Image damage

62 Conformity

63 Unemployment

64 Addiction

65 Loneliness

66 Prudishness

67 Cohesion

68 Humiliation

69 Blackface

70 Dehumanising

71 Shitstorm

72 Anonymity

73 Big mouth

74 Making a mess

75 Behaviour

76 Embarrassment

77 Subtle differences

78 Long skirts

79 Cruising

80 Civilising process

81 Laughing

82 Naivety

83 Provocation

84 Perversion

85 Dirty mind

86 Condemnation

87 Shamelessness

88 Self-portrayal

89 ‘Soul murder’

90 Abuse of power

91 Nuclear family

92 Motherly love

93 Narcissism

94 Imperfection

95 Being different

96 Empathy

97 Making a fool of oneself

98 Artificiality

99 Authenticity

100 Shame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

Photo: David Brandt

 

 

VENUE

Deutsches Hygiene-Museum

Lingnerplatz 1

D-01069 Dresden, Germany

0351 4846-400

www.dhmd.de

 

OPENING HOURS

Tue to Sun and public holidays

10 am to 6 pm

Closed 24 and 25 December 2016 and New Year’s Day

 

ADMISSIONS

Standard adult ticket: EUR 8

Concessions: EUR 4

Admission free up to age 16

Family ticket: EUR 13

 

DIRECTIONS

From the city centre/Frauenkirche approx. 10 minutes on foot or take tram lines 1, 2, 4 or 12 to ‘Deutsches Hygiene-Museum’ or tram lines 10 and 13 to ‘Grosser Garten’

 

EXHIBITION DATA

Curator: Daniel Tyradellis

Project Team: Johanna Stapelfeldt, Sophie Plagemann, Cornelia Wagner

Coordination: Sophie Plagemann, Cornelia Wagner

Scenography: Bundschuh Architekten, Berlin

Production management: Anna Kalvelage, KAWOKA Architekten, Berlin

Graphic design: Yvonne Quirmbach, Berlin

Area: 800 sqm

Number of exhibits: ca. 250

 

Covering up the genitals I: Boastfulness?

Codpiece from a suit of armour, Nuremberg, 1540–1550

© Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg.
Photo: Monika Runge

 

 

Is it possible to be publicly ashamed?

Christian Jankowski, Schamkasten, 1992

© Courtesy of the Artist